2020 marks the 25th anniversary of my website cerkit.com. It's been a great asset and a personal liability (there were a few weeks where I posted inappropriate things to my blog that got me into a lot of trouble). It has slowed down lately because I'm not really sure what to write about. My day job is mostly web support and website maintenance, so I'm not doing any new development.

It's been a lot of fun exploring new web technologies using my website as a test bed. However, at some point, I switched it over to exclusively use a blog engine.

I started with handwritten HTML (I used HotDog HTML editor at the time) and eventually switched to Microsoft FrontPage. After that, I started using Microsoft Visual InterDev (which eventually merged with other Microsoft tools and became Visual Studio). After using Visual Studio for a while, blogs became a thing, so I searched for a .NET compatible blogging engine. I discovered DasBlog and became active in its development (it was my first "open source" project contribution). I don't remember what I did, but I remember having to go through a code review with Clemens Vasters and Scott Hanselman. I was fortunate enough to have my website listed in the list of websites in the default install of DasBlog, so I gained a lot of Internet traffic from that (it also drastically improved my Search Engine Optimization).

I had over 1500 RSS subscribers before my public meltdown, and I leveraged that influence to help me land a job with Microsoft. That was the beginning of the end. My meltdown was very public, and after that, I disappeared into the shadows for five years, only having emerged in 2010.

I'm much more stable, and I avoid controversial topics on my website now. I mainly stick to fiction and technology posts with some music thrown in here-and-there.

It's been a great 25 years, and I have grown a lot since the website's inception in 1995. I hope that the website continues to offer something to someone. Although, I mostly use it to post about what I'm thinking or doing at the time, even if no one reads it any more.

You can see the various versions of my website through the years on the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine.